punch

I. punch punch 1 [pʌntʆ] verb [transitive]
to make a hole in something, for example a card that shows what time you arrived at work or left work:

• Any employee forgetting to punch his card must report it to his supervisor as soon as possible for payment authorization.

punch in
to make a hole in a card as a record of the time when you arrived at work, especially at a factory
punch out
to make a hole in a card as a record of the time when you left work, especially at a factory
  [m0] II. punch punch also ˈhole punch noun [countable] OFFICE
a metal tool used for making holes in paper or steel:

• Pass me the punch.

* * *

punch UK US /pʌnʃ/ verb [T]
to make a hole in something using a special tool or machine: »

I have to punch my time card when I come into work every morning.

punch a hole in sth »

They brought in a team of specialists to punch holes in the steel boiler.

punch above your weight — Cf. punch above your weight
punch the clock — Cf. punch the clock

Financial and business terms. 2012.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Punch — can refer to:Tools* Punch (metalworking), a tool used to create an impression in a metal * Punch (numismatics), an intermediate used in the process of manufacturing coins * Punch (typography), an intermediate used in the process of manufacturing… …   Wikipedia

  • Punch — /punch/, n. 1. the chief male character in a Punch and Judy show. 2. pleased as Punch, highly pleased; delighted: They were pleased as Punch at having been asked to come along. [short for PUNCHINELLO] * * * I English illustrated periodical… …   Universalium

  • punch — punch1 [punch] n. [prob. < var. of ponchon: see PUNCHEON1] 1. a) a tool driven or pressed against a surface that is to be stamped, pierced, etc. b) a tool driven against a nail, bolt, etc. that is to be worked in, or against a pin that is to… …   English World dictionary

  • Punch — Punch, n. [Hind. p[=a]nch five, Skr. pa?can. So called because composed of five ingredients, viz., sugar, arrack, spice, water, and lemon juice. See {Five}.] A beverage composed of wine or distilled liquor, water (or milk), sugar, and the juice… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Punch — Punch, n. [Abbrev. fr. puncheon.] 1. A tool, usually of steel, variously shaped at one end for different uses, and either solid, for stamping or for perforating holes in metallic plates and other substances, or hollow and sharpedged, for cutting… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • punch — Ⅰ. punch [1] ► VERB 1) strike with the fist. 2) press (a button or key on a machine). 3) N. Amer. drive (cattle) by prodding them with a stick. ► NOUN 1) a blow with the fist. 2) informal …   English terms dictionary

  • punch up — ˌpunch ˈup [transitive] [present tense I/you/we/they punch up he/she/it punches up present participle punching up past tense …   Useful english dictionary

  • Punch — Punch, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Punched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Punching}.] [From {Punch}, n., a tool; cf. F. poin[,c]onner.] To perforate or stamp with an instrument by pressure, or a blow; as, to punch a hole; to punch ticket. [1913 Webster] {Punching… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Punch — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Punch puede referirse a: Punch y Judy, títeres tradicionales ingleses Punch (revista) Obtenido de Punch Categoría: Wikipedia:Desambiguación …   Wikipedia Español

  • punch|y — «PUHN chee», adjective, punch|i|er, punch|i|est. Informal. 1. having lots of punch; forceful; terse; hard hitting: » …   Useful english dictionary

  • Punch — Punch, n. [Prov. E. Cf. {Punchy}.] 1. A short, fat fellow; anything short and thick. [1913 Webster] I . . . did hear them call their fat child punch, which pleased me mightily, that word being become a word of common use for all that is thick and …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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